Charlie Munger recommends

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Stunning books Charlie Munger recommends everyone to read

“Influence: The Psychologyof Persuasion” by Robert B. Cialdini

– Charlie Munger

Also recommended by Whitney Tilson, mentioned in Warren Buffett: Best Business Books, Guy Kawasaki On Books Every Businessmen Should Read

A book that’s earned its spot on the New York Times bestseller book list, Cialdini has concentrated over 30 years of research into how and why people respond with a “yes” instead of a no. Forbes magazine hailed Cialdini’s work on their favorite “75 Smartest” business books list, with its explanation of how people feel obligated to return favors (reciprocity) and why commitment is so powerful. Charlie Munger, the co-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and leader of Wesco Financial, also has a copy on his favorite reading list as one of the top three business books necessary for negotiation success.

“Benjamin Franklin”by Carl Van Doren

Franklin is as well-known for his romantic and diplomatic exploits in France, as his work in the fledgling American Congress and many inventions. Van Doren goes beyond the standard stories about Franklin’s truly dangerous experiment with electricity (harnessing lightning via a flying kite), to describing what happened between his exciting early career in journalism and financial difficulties at retirement age. Listed as one of Charlie Munger’s favorite books on Gurufocus.com, history fans of both the stock genius and the creative printer of the 1800’s will be intrigued by this Pulitzer prize-winning 800-page biography.

“Titan: The Life of JohnD. Rockefeller, Sr.” by Ron Chernow

Those interested in rags-to-riches stories can’t do better than Chernow’s tribute to the grandaddy of all oil tycoons: John D. Rockefeller. While other business moguls have gotten an early start in enterprise (Rockefeller profited from selling candy to family members at a young age), not all of them have had bigamist fathers, or gone on to become iconic billionaires. The strange mixture of Rockefeller’s religious devotion to money and God, capitalism and Communist-like monopolization of the markets, is woven alongside the story of a devoted family man with significant personal quirks – and cash. The Street calls this book a necessary addition to the book list of ambitious stock traders.

“Yes!: 50 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Persuasive” by Noah Goldstein

Goldstein’s book almost reads like a marketing manual, fromits laws of scarcity and reciprocity, to its focus on the influence of positiverather than negative values. The power of persuasion has been intriguing tostudents since the ancient Greeks, and perfected by business devotees atToastmasters, but Goldstein adds science to sophism for an extra kick. Thiswork on how to harness shifts in social psychology is touted as a good additionto book lists, from business professors at Stanford and the University ofSouthern California, to an editor of the London Times.

“Einstein: His Life and Universe” by Walter Isaacson

Einstein is always a fascinating character, not only because of his hairstyle, but also because of the mixture of devotion to scientific processes and the power of creativity. As Isaacson points out, the great physicist was not as devoted to personal relationships (the book includes a true anecdote about Einstein’s written requirement for a lack of required intimacy with his first wife) as to a theoretical adherence to tolerance and destruction of tyranny. Descriptions of Einstein’s balance between romantic poetry and enthusiasm for theories on light make him quite a human character, which makes it a good addition to any thinker’s reading list.

“Outliers: The Story ofSuccess” by Malcolm Gladwell

Also recommended by Jay-Z

A lifelong fan of the fascinating story of failure,Gladwell, turned his eye to unlikely success stories. Though the Tipping Pointmay have moved the author on to personal fame and fortune, this book about thehard workers who scrambled their way to the top certainly contributed toGladwell’s inclusion in Time’s list of influential people. Beatles fans will beglad that their brilliance is recognized, and those who favor reading lists ofGreenwich Village authors should note that it’s Gladwell’s residence. His ownfascinating background, as the child of a math teacher and thegreat-granddaughter of Jamaican plantation owners, no doubt contributed to thebook’s assertion that society and environment play a strong role in success.

“Fiasco: The Inside Story of a Wall Street Trader ” by Frank Partnoy

– Charlie Munger at his UCSB talk

Especially in light of the last few years of Wall Street’s issues, Portnoy’s scathing polemic against a murky industry are even more relevant today. The author details his vast amount of personal knowledge, as a former attorney and Morgan Stanley investment banker, on the manipulative nature of the derivatives market. It is recommended on reading lists from theoretical colleges of business (such as Warrington) to corporate giants (such as Goldman Sachs), and should prove a valuable addition to the book lists of any business leader or hopeful rising star.

 “Living within Limits:Ecology, Economics, and Population Taboos ” by Garrett Hardin

From local examples to global implications, biologist and population philosopher Hardin details why it’s necessary to put limits on the growth of the human family. Hardin argues that our world is a closed system, and so needs hard-and-fast rules to curb explosive population growth and its effect on the global economy, adding quotes from Malthus to Charles Darwin to make his point. Hardin’s enthused readership recommends this addition to serious educators’ reading lists, including Charles Minns (an ecologist at the Bayfield Institute) and businessman Charlie Munger.

  “The Language Instinct:How the Mind Creates Language” by Steven Pinker

Also recommended by Bill Gates

Language is a matter that cannot be neglected in everyday life. It is made to communicate. But few people question themselves: what is a language? How is it structurized, who made it, how come we can understand each other? Steven Pinker can answer all those questions. Using multiple examples that are easy to understand, he guides us through the mysterious world of language.

“Barbarians at the Gate” by Bryan Burrough

In a similar vein to Fiasco, Frank Partnoy’s warning on Wall Street greed and corruption, John Helyar’s and Bryan Burrough’s work outlines a Mafia-like corporate takeover of RJR Nabisco – the company who created the Oreo. While the book didn’t get immediate fame and acclaim for the Wall Street journalists, it is now featured on recommended reading lists from Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times, to London-based financial corporation Colobus. This multi-faceted story of a $25 billion leveraged buyout is as interesting as the checkered post-buyout careers of the principal movers.

“Conspiracy of Fools: A True Story” by Kurt Eichenwald

Conspiracy theories are great fodder for fictional novels, but a true story is even better. Written by a New York Times journalist, this major addition to conspiracy theorists’ book lists details the stunning rise and crashing fall of energy giant Enron. It details the years of stock fiddling and cover-up that led to the leaders’ prison sentences – and the dual fall of accounting firm Arthur Andersen. CEOs such as Michael Ruettgers of EMC and Charlie Munger of Berkshire Hathaway have put this story at the top of their recommended reading lists, along with consulting firm Cambridge Associates.

Whitney Tilson recommends

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The investor Whitney Tilson recommends

“Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion” by Robert B. Cialdini

– Whitney Tilson

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger

A book that’s earned its spot on the New York Times bestseller book list, Cialdini has concentrated over 30 years of research into how and why people respond with a “yes” instead of a no. Forbes magazine hailed Cialdini’s work on their favorite “75 Smartest” business books list, with its explanation of how people feel obligated to return favors (reciprocity) and why commitment is so powerful. Charlie Munger, the co-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and leader of Wesco Financial, also has a copy on his favorite reading list as one of the top three business books necessary for negotiation success.

  “Common Stocks andUncommon Profits and Other Writings” by Philip A. Fisher

– Whitney Tilson

Also recommended by Warren Buffett

Another on the must-read Warren Buffet book list, Philip Fisher has been quoted as even more influential than Benjamin Graham on the reading of the Oracle of Omaha. Fisher, like some other success icons, dropped out of a prestigious university (Stanford) to venture into the world of capitalism. Impressively, he had entered Stanford at age 15, and qualified for the graduate program only a few years later. Fisher lived his long-term advice on retaining stocks for years instead of months, holding Motorola stock for almost 50 years. Like Graham, Fisher advised extensive company research before buying, though he classed water-cooler chat (or “scuttlebutt”) as information.

 “Poor Charlie’s Almanack:The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger” by Peter D. Kaufman

– Whitney Tilson

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Bill Ackman

Kaufman’s editorial tribute to Warren Buffet’s businesspartner and Costco director, billionaire Charlie Munger, underlines Munger’sfocus on lasting character traits and the importance of behavioral psychology.Since Munger believed in the importance of knowledge in a Renaissance-likearray of knowledge via extensive reading lists, Kaufman’s book displays avariety of ways to know Charlie. The biography shows Charlie’s personalbackground and experiences, the quotes show Charlie’s concentrated wisdom, andCharlie’s own words stand out in ten transcripts of his speeches.

“Security Analysis”by Benjamin Graham

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Bill Ackman, Jamie Dimon

The logic of buying undervalued securities is laid bare in this 1930’s classic. It has ended up on a JP Morgan summer reading list for private bankers, while the real-life examples make this book accessible to more experienced individual investors. Other topics covered include the importance of dividends and diversity within the portfolio. Though this book is most known for being on the favorite list of Warren Buffet, who called it his “Bible”, it has also shown up on the favorite reading list of investments author Whitney Tilson, and billionaire Bill Ackman.

The IntelligentInvestor” by Benjamin Graham

– Whitney Tilson

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Bill Ackman, Jamie Dimon, Kevin Rose

If investors are intimidated by Graham’s prior groundbreaking work, “Security Analysis”, this book makes a good introduction to the difference between making investments and capitalizing on speculation – a risky business. Another favorite book of Warren Buffet’s (who wrote the introduction), it covers emotional decision-making versus rational analysis of markets and their fluctuations. Forbes magazine author Jason Zweig also counts it at the top of his favorite book list, calling it “prophetic”. Graham’s own history as a survivor of the Great Depression stock crash, and master of detailed company research yielding 14% annual returns, qualifies him to mentor others down the investment path.

“You Can Be a Stock MarketGenius” by Joel Greenblatt

– Whitney Tilson

Also recommended by Bill Ackman, David Einhorn

Though the title may sound a bit far-fetched, Greenblatt asserts that the stock-picking individual does have distinct advantages over the professional. Without the pressure of quarterly returns, and without the distractions of making a living on educated guesses (especially spin-offs), Greenblatt asserts the ability of the little man over the master of the impressive portfolio. This work is a welcome addition to the reading lists of personal investors (and Columbia Business School students), a note of hope in a discouraging and confusing world of savvy (and sometimes criminal) investment schemes.

David Einhorn’s favorite book

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   “You Can Be a Stock MarketGenius” by Joel Greenblatt

Also recommended by Bill Ackman, Whitney Tilson

Though the title may sound a bit far-fetched, Greenblatt asserts that the stock-picking individual does have distinct advantages over the professional. Without the pressure of quarterly returns, and without the distractions of making a living on educated guesses (especially spin-offs), Greenblatt asserts the ability of the little man over the master of the impressive portfolio. This work is a welcome addition to the reading lists of personal investors (and Columbia Business School students), a note of hope in a discouraging and confusing world of savvy (and sometimes criminal) investment schemes.

Bill Ackman recommends

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The investor Bill Ackman about the most influential books for him

 Security Analysis”by Benjamin Graham

– from the book Confidence Game.

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Whitney Tilson, Jamie Dimon

The logic of buying undervalued securities is laid bare in this 1930’s classic. It has ended up on a JP Morgan summer reading list for private bankers, while the real-life examples make this book accessible to more experienced individual investors. Other topics covered include the importance of dividends and diversity within the portfolio. Though this book is most known for being on the favorite list of Warren Buffet, who called it his “Bible”, it has also shown up on the favorite reading list of investments author Whitney Tilson, and billionaire Bill Ackman.

“The IntelligentInvestor” by Benjamin Graham

– from the book Confidence Game.

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Whitney Tilson, Jamie Dimon, Kevin Rose

If investors are intimidated by Graham’s prior groundbreaking work, “Security Analysis”, this book makes a good introduction to the difference between making investments and capitalizing on speculation – a risky business. Another favorite book of Warren Buffet’s (who wrote the introduction), it covers emotional decision-making versus rational analysis of markets and their fluctuations. Forbes magazine author Jason Zweig also counts it at the top of his favorite book list, calling it “prophetic”. Graham’s own history as a survivor of the Great Depression stock crash, and master of detailed company research yielding 14% annual returns, qualifies him to mentor others down the investment path.

You Can Be a Stock MarketGenius” by Joel Greenblatt

– Bill Ackman

Also recommended by Whitney Tilson, David Einhorn

Though the title may sound a bit far-fetched, Greenblatt asserts that the stock-picking individual does have distinct advantages over the professional. Without the pressure of quarterly returns, and without the distractions of making a living on educated guesses (especially spin-offs), Greenblatt asserts the ability of the little man over the master of the impressive portfolio. This work is a welcome addition to the reading lists of personal investors (and Columbia Business School students), a note of hope in a discouraging and confusing world of savvy (and sometimes criminal) investment schemes.

  “One Up On Wall Street :How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market” by PeterLynch

– from the book Confidence Game.

This book by Peter Lynch may sound eerily similar to Benjamin Graham’s Intelligent Investor – because it is. Both were added to a top 10 reading list by Investopedia in 2009, as well as the recommended reading list for the Stanford GSB Finance and Investment Club. Both Graham and Lynch promote the concept of value investing (looking at business value long-term versus short-term gains), especially in stable but unexciting companies, and lived to beat the markets in their own time. However, Lynch’s work is much more readable and accessible to the average reader of investment literature.

Jamie Dimon recommends

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One of the most famous influential and effective businessmen about best books that have helped him.

                  “Undaunted Courage: Meriwether Lewis, Thomas Jefferson, and the Opening of the American West” by Stephen Ambrose

While every American schoolchild has heard about Lewis and Clark’s expedition across the United States, few grownups know the more fascinating details of how the West was explored – before it was won. For instance, history book aficionados might not remember that President Jefferson’s secretary was none other than Meriweather Lewis, who fell from hero status in the world of politics for discovering a lack of projected waterways. Neither Sacajawea’s role nor the main obstacles to pre-automobile travel (weather and insects) are ignored, nor Lewis’ debt-inspired turn to alcohol. Dale Walker of Historynet.com declares this book list addition to be better than the work of Richard Dillon.

                  “A Short History of Nearly Everything” by Bill Bryson

This new edition of one of the best history books is lavishly illustrated to convey, in pictures as in words, Bill Bryson’s exciting, informative journey into the world of science. In A Short History of Nearly Everything, beloved author Bill Bryson confronts his greatest challenge yet: to understand—and, if possible, answer—the oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as his territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. The result is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it.

                  “Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies” by Jared Diamond

The phenomenal bestseller; over 1.5 million copies sold; is now a major PBS special.

This book has a truly universal appeal. College students should add it to their summer reading list program, if applying to technology institutes such as ITT or Devry. History students can amaze their teachers by the addition of quotes to their AP papers. Fans of Bill Gates can read Diamond’s work, and understand why it was praised so highly by the founder of Microsoft. Essentially, Diamond points out that some societies rise and fall based on the role of environmental opportunities and damage, and technology. Budding politicians can begin an educated debate based on whether or not Diamond is secretly promoting a perspective of Caucasian dominance.

                  “Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln” by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Springfield, the home of fictional character Bart Simpson, was first known as the proving ground of Abraham Lincoln. For 25 years, he had labored to rise from a lack of means (he arrived on a borrowed horse) to a place of prominence. In an unusual twist, Goodwins’ book outlines the role of Lincoln’s friends, from a 300-pound judge to the future President’s loyal legal partner. It also describes vignettes of days gone by, from circuit-riding attorneys to the birthing groans of the anti-slavery Republican Party. This 10-week addition to the New York Times bestselling book list should be added to any serious history student’s reading list.

                  “Jack: Straight from the Gut” Jack Welch

Also recommended by Warren Buffett

From layoffs to glory, Jack Welch tells his story of how General Electric went from the bottom of the stock pile to an investment worth having. Management tips are woven into personal stories about good and bad decisions with continual ripple effects, such as the Crotonville training center that moved students along the tiers of upper management. Welch puts feet on some of Peter Drucker’s favorite list of ideas, including the necessity of change and the need to build a corporation with the right people, instead of on the backs of people while bilking the customer. This business book has been included on business reading lists, from Hampden-Sydney College to Warren Buffet’s favorites of 2010.

                  “Only the Paranoid Survive” by Andrew S. Grove

Also recommended by Steve Jobs

According to the Wall Street Journal, this book is one of coach Jim Harbaugh’s favorite manuals for his football team, the San Francisco 49ers. As CEO, Grove steered Intel toward its status as top creator of computer chips that control our digital world, qualifying him to speak about the necessity of adaptation to instant corporate change. The milestones of change contain an instructive pattern, and Grove uses some of Intel’s challenges (such as the Pentium processor flaw) to show what worked in keeping slightly ahead of Internet expansion: debate, anticipation of change, and seeking answers beyond the job title. Andy Grove currently holds an advisory position at Intel, and helps teach a business seminar at Stanford’s School of Business.

                  “Sam Walton: Made In America” by Sam Walton

Also recommended by Warren Buffett

After entering into a battle with cancer, Sam Walton decided to outline the shaky beginnings and roller-coaster ride of Wal-Mart. The result is a zany blend of common-sense tips, quotable aphorisms, and true stories that outdo fiction by a long shot. Not surprisingly, the founder’s odyssey is featured on Wal-Mart reading lists, as well as those of contributors to the Motley Fool (such as Jeremy MacNealy) and 800-CEO-Read. Walton is unapologetic about both his mistakes and his successes, and includes equal-time stories about zealous managers who moved at the drop of a hat to further the breakneck speed of grand openings across the United States.

                  “Life Is What You Make It” by Peter Buffett

Also recommended by Bill Gates, Bill Clinton, mentioned in Books That Inspire CNN Founder Ted Turner

.

Though the author bears such famous last name, Buffet, he claims that he hasn´t inherited much from his parents, concerning materialistic issues. He was gifted with a family philosophy: “Everybody must find his own way in this life”. This warm, mind broadening, and inspirational book asks every reader, what will he choose: the way of least resistance or the way greatest satisfaction? In some sense this is the life story of Peter Buffet himself.

                  >”Security Analysis” by Benjamin Graham

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Bill Ackman, Whitney Tilson

The logic of buying undervalued securities is laid bare in this 1930’s classic. It has ended up on a JP Morgan summer reading list for private bankers, while the real-life examples make this book accessible to more experienced individual investors. Other topics covered include the importance of dividends and diversity within the portfolio. Though this book is most known for being on the favorite list of Warren Buffet, who called it his “Bible”, it has also shown up on the favorite reading list of investments author Whitney Tilson, and billionaire Bill Ackman.

                  “The Intelligent Investor” by Benjamin Graham

Also recommended by Warren Buffett, Bill Ackman, Whitney Tilson, Kevin Rose

If investors are intimidated by Graham’s prior groundbreaking work, “Security Analysis”, this book makes a good introduction to the difference between making investments and capitalizing on speculation – a risky business. Another favorite book of Warren Buffet’s (who wrote the introduction), it covers emotional decision-making versus rational analysis of markets and their fluctuations. Forbes magazine author Jason Zweig also counts it at the top of his favorite book list, calling it “prophetic”. Graham’s own history as a survivor of the Great Depression stock crash, and master of detailed company research yielding 14% annual returns, qualifies him to mentor others down the investment path.

Warren Buffett recommends

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photo: Fortune Live Media

The greatest investor, “Wizard of Omaha” recommends best business books that have shaped his personality. Explore his book list.

“Jack: Straight from the Gut” Jack Welch

From layoffs to glory, Jack Welch tells his story of how General Electric went from the bottom of the stock pile to an investment worth having. Management tips are woven into personal stories about good and bad decisions with continual ripple effects, such as the Crotonville training center that moved students along the tiers of upper management. Welch puts feet on some of Peter Drucker’s favorite list of ideas, including the necessity of change and the need to build a corporation with the right people, instead of on the backs of people while bilking the customer. This business book has been included on business reading lists, from Hampden-Sydney College to Warren Buffet’s favorites of 2010.

“Sam Walton: Made InAmerica” by Sam Walton

Also recommended by Jamie Dimon

After entering into a battle with cancer, Sam Walton decided to outline the shaky beginnings and roller-coaster ride of Wal-Mart. The result is a zany blend of common-sense tips, quotable aphorisms, and true stories that outdo fiction by a long shot. Not surprisingly, the founder’s odyssey is featured on Wal-Mart reading lists, as well as those of contributors to the Motley Fool (such as Jeremy MacNealy) and 800-CEO-Read. Walton is unapologetic about both his mistakes and his successes, and includes equal-time stories about zealous managers who moved at the drop of a hat to further the breakneck speed of grand openings across the United States.

“Influence: The Psychologyof Persuasion” by Robert B. Cialdini

Also recommended by Whitney Tilson, Charlie Munger, mentioned in Guy Kawasaki On Books Every Businessmen Should Read

A book that’s earned its spot on the New York Times bestseller book list, Cialdini has concentrated over 30 years of research into how and why people respond with a “yes” instead of a no. Forbes magazine hailed Cialdini’s work on their favorite “75 Smartest” business books list, with its explanation of how people feel obligated to return favors (reciprocity) and why commitment is so powerful. Charlie Munger, the co-chairman of Berkshire Hathaway and leader of Wesco Financial, also has a copy on his favorite reading list as one of the top three business books necessary for negotiation success.

“Business Adventures:Twelve Classic Tales from the World of Wall Street” by John Brooks

Bill Gates’ second favorite book on business

– Bill Gates

Also mentioned in Top 10 Books To Read According To Bill Gates

“The Man Behind theMicrochip: Robert Noyce and the Invention of Silicon Valley” by LeslieBerlin

– Warren Buffett

Another entry on the Warren Buffet business book list is Berlin’s biography of Robert Noyce, who accomplished daring maneuvers in and out of the land of technology. Based on first-hand interviews of other key business leaders, including Steve Jobs and Gordon Moore, Berlin shows the approachable personality and keen insight of the man who developed the secret ingredient for our computer-based world: the integrated circuit. Sadly, Berlin also points out the personal flaws that detracted from the genius of Noyce, who co-founded Fairchild Semiconductor.

Security Analysis”by Benjamin Graham

– Warren Buffett

Also recommended by Jamie Dimon, Bill Ackman, Whitney Tilson

The logic of buying undervalued securities is laid bare in this 1930’s classic. It has ended up on a JP Morgan summer reading list for private bankers, while the real-life examples make this book accessible to more experienced individual investors. Other topics covered include the importance of dividends and diversity within the portfolio. Though this book is most known for being on the favorite list of Warren Buffet, who called it his “Bible”, it has also shown up on the favorite reading list of investments author Whitney Tilson, and billionaire Bill Ackman.

The IntelligentInvestor” by Benjamin Graham

Also recommended by Jamie Dimon, Bill Ackman, Whitney Tilson, Kevin Rose

If investors are intimidated by Graham’s prior groundbreaking work, “Security Analysis”, this book makes a good introduction to the difference between making investments and capitalizing on speculation – a risky business. Another favorite book of Warren Buffet’s (who wrote the introduction), it covers emotional decision-making versus rational analysis of markets and their fluctuations. Forbes magazine author Jason Zweig also counts it at the top of his favorite book list, calling it “prophetic”. Graham’s own history as a survivor of the Great Depression stock crash, and master of detailed company research yielding 14% annual returns, qualifies him to mentor others down the investment path.

 “Common Stocks andUncommon Profits and Other Writings” by Philip A. Fisher

Also recommended by Whitney Tilson

Another on the must-read Warren Buffet book list, Philip Fisher has been quoted as even more influential than Benjamin Graham on the reading of the Oracle of Omaha. Fisher, like some other success icons, dropped out of a prestigious university (Stanford) to venture into the world of capitalism. Impressively, he had entered Stanford at age 15, and qualified for the graduate program only a few years later. Fisher lived his long-term advice on retaining stocks for years instead of months, holding Motorola stock for almost 50 years. Like Graham, Fisher advised extensive company research before buying, though he classed water-cooler chat (or “scuttlebutt”) as information.

                  “Poor Charlie’s Almanack: The Wit and Wisdom of Charles T. Munger” by Peter D. Kaufman

Also recommended by Whitney Tilson, Bill Ackman

Kaufman’s editorial tribute to Warren Buffet’s business partner and Costco director, billionaire Charlie Munger, underlines Munger’s focus on lasting character traits and the importance of behavioral psychology. Since Munger believed in the importance of knowledge in a Renaissance-like array of knowledge via extensive reading lists, Kaufman’s book displays a variety of ways to know Charlie. The biography shows Charlie’s personal background and experiences, the quotes show Charlie’s concentrated wisdom, and Charlie’s own words stand out in ten transcripts of his speeches.

Read also Charlie Munger’s Favorite Books

                  “Personal history” by Katherine Graham

Influenced by an overbearing mother and husband, as well as famous author Gloria Steinem, Katharine Graham’s autobiography reads like a realistic fairy tale. Daughter of billionaire parents, she was raised by a nanny and governess and went on to inherit management of the struggling Washington Post. Her tennis partner was Nixon’s secretary of labor (George Shulz). Her own success was a surprise, like the Watergate scandal uncovered by Post journalists. Her self-effacing nature comes through in the book, as well as her quiet determination. Not surprisingly, Graham’s book was added to one of Oprah’s book lists of the top eight to read “with a broken heart”.

                  “Running on Empty: How the Democratic and Republican Parties Are Bankrupting Our Future and What Americans Can Do About It” by Peter G. Peterson

– Warren Buffett

An investment banker with a Cassandra complex, Peterson has taken to the written word to wake up America to the gritty fact of looming financial chaos. Arizona Senator John McCain and journalist Tom Brokaw have added this book to their reading lists, recommending that others do the same. A former chairman of New York’s Federal Reserve bank, Peterson delves into the complicated nature of tax cuts and federal entitlement programs. True to the title, both parties are chastised for their irresponsible attitude toward government programs such as Social Security and Medicare, from George W. Bush to Senator Kerry.

                  “The Little Book of Common Sense Investing” by John C. Bogle

– Warren Buffett

The former CEO of Vanguard encourages investors to do the simple things that work over the long haul, such as buying into the success of a business with your stock purchase instead of just buying a piece of portfolio. Also, small percentage fees plus taxes can drive down the profits you make, even if you do beat the market. Tips such as these point toward the value of indexing, which has created wealth for many Vanguard clients. This Little Book ends up on the ‘to-read’ Simple Dollar book list of 52 personal finance books, and Koch Capital Management also gives its seal of approval on a recommended reading list, along with Warren Buffet.

                  “The Ten Commandments for Business Failure” by Donald R. Keough

– Warren Buffett

Also recommended by Bill Gates

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